Journal of Healthy Eating and Active Living http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal <p>JHEAL is an international, online, open-access, quarterly, peer-reviewed journal focused on publishing high-quality studies in the areas of active living and healthy eating. Of particular interest are studies of the interactional nature between active living and/or healthy eating and the “environment”, broadly defined to include social, cultural, economic, political, natural, virtual and built dimensions. Papers that report on multi-level studies and interventions are also welcome. We publish full length reports, brief communications, meta-analyses, scoping reviews, translational and practice-based research, policy and systems change evaluations, natural experiment studies, case studies, notes from the field, commentaries, and systematic reviews. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies are all encouraged. Because we value the application of research, we invite submissions from researchers as well as practice- and policy-oriented submissions from practitioners, policy makers, and advocates. Research and practice/policy papers will have separately-labeled sections, and reviewers with appropriate expertise will be selected. We are also open to publishing digital media files including maps, visualizations and other modern media. </p> <p> </p> Prof Pubs LLC en-US Journal of Healthy Eating and Active Living 2766-4651 <p>All articles published in the journal are open access under the <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">CC-BY Creative Commons version 4.0 attribution license</a>. The authors will retain copyright of all articles published in the journal. The journal will be granted a right to publish from the authors upon acceptance of their manuscript. </p> Parental preference for park attributes related to children’s use of parks in low-income, racial/ethnic diverse neighborhoods http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/6 <p>Public parks offer free and easy to access spaces for outdoor recreation, which is essential for children’s outdoor play and physical activity in low-income communities.&nbsp; Because parks and playgrounds contribute to children’s physical, social, and emotional development, it is critical to understand what makes them attractive and welcoming for families with young children. Parents can be a key determinant to children visiting parks, with their preferences influencing whether or not families visit parks in their neighborhoods. Past studies have posited there are significant differences across racial/ethnic populations in preferred park characteristics, but few have investigated specific park attributes parents from different racial and ethnic groups desire for their children. This study examined attributes associated with parental preferences for parks in low-income diverse communities in New York City, New York and Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, USA.</p> <p>Parents’ responses were grouped into 10 categories using content analysis, with four key preference themes identified: physical attributes, experiences, social environment, and amenities. Physical attributes (i.e., playgrounds, sports fields, green spaces) were most desired among all groups. A significant difference across race/ethnic groups was found in New York but not in Raleigh-Durham. In New York, Latino parents had a strong preference for experience attributes (i.e. safety, safe facilities, cleanliness) which differed from other groups. Examining Latino parents in both cities we found no significant difference between cities. Although there is no one-size-fits-all approach to encourage park use, our finding suggests facilities and park safety are modifiable ways local government agencies could design and maintain parks that would be preferred by parents for their children. Future research should examine how neighborhood context may influence parent preferences related to parks.</p> <p>Parents’ responses were grouped into 10 categories using content analysis, with four key preference themes identified. A significant difference across race/ethnic groups was found in New York but not in Raleigh-Durham. Examining Latino parents in both cities we found no significant difference between cities. Physical attributes (i.e., playgrounds, sports fields, green spaces) were most desired among all groups. In New York, Latino parents had a strong preference for Experience attributes (i.e. safety, safe facilities, cleanliness) which differed from other groups. Future research should examine how neighborhood context may influence parent preferences related to parks and children’s physical activity.</p> S Scott Ogletree Jing Huei Huang Claudia Alberico Oriol Marquet Myron F Floyd J Aaron Hipp Copyright (c) 2020 Scott Ogletree, Jing Huei Huang, Claudia Alberico, Oriol Marquet, Myron F Floyd, J Aaron Hipp https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 6 15 Differences in child physical activity levels at rural Play Streets due to activity type and sex http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/5 <p>Children are significantly less active during summer months and rural children may face unique barriers to engaging in physical activity (PA). Play Streets is a low-cost way communities can provide safe play opportunities by activating public spaces. Four low-income rural communities received mini-grants to implement four three-hour Play Streets throughout summer 2017 for a total of 16 Play Streets. System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) and iSOPARC<sup>®</sup> were used to assess PA. Chi-squared tests of homogeneity determined significant differences in the proportion of children observed as active based on sex and target area type. Binomial logistic regression was used to determine if target area characteristics (i.e., type, equipped, supervised, organized) and presence of other active children or adults increased the odds of observing a child as active. In total, 1,750 children were observed across all 16 Play Streets; roughly half of all children (48.6% of males, 48.7% of females) were observed as active. There was no significant difference in proportion of children observed as active based on sex of the child (OR=0.99, 95% CI:0.82-1.20). Significant differences in the proportion of active children were found between target area categories. Males were significantly more likely to be observed as active in areas which were equipped or organized. All children were significantly more likely to be active if there was another active child present in the same area. These results add to the growing literature surrounding successful implementation of Play Streets in rural settings, social influence, and active play.</p> Tyler Prochnow M. Renee Umstattd Meyer Christina N. Bridges Hamilton Keshia M. Pollack Porter Copyright (c) 2020 Tyler Prochnow, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Christina N. Bridges Hamilton, Keshia M. Pollack Porter https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 16 26 Electronic Devices as Correlates of Sedentary Behavior and Screen Time Among Diverse Low-Income Adolescents During the School Year and Summer Time http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/7 <p>Excessive screen time among adolescents increases risk for overweight/obesity. Having electronic devices in the adolescent’s bedroom is associated with more screen time. The present study expanded on previous studies by also examining portable personal electronic devices and social media membership as correlates of screen time use and total sedentary time in the school year and summer among diverse low-income adolescents. Adolescents aged 10-17 years were recruited from lower-income areas, and n=150 completed surveys and wore accelerometers in both the school year and summer: 34 African Americans, 23 American Indians, 16 Asian/Pacific Islanders, 39 Latinos, and 38 White/non-Hispanics. Total sedentary time was computed from accelerometers. Recreational screen time was assessed with a 3-item validated scale. Adolescents reported the presence of 6 electronic devices in their bedrooms, ownership of 4 portable devices, and social media membership. General linear modeling was conducted for both time periods, with demographic covariates and interactions with sex and race-ethnicity. More electronic devices in bedrooms were related to more screen time during the school year and summer, and to more total sedentary time in summer. Personal electronics were only related to more screen time in the school year. Social media membership was related to more total sedentary time in summer, but only among African Americans, American Indians, and non-Hispanic Whites. Electronic devices in bedrooms was confirmed as a risk factor for sedentary behavior among low-income adolescents of color. Social media membership and use should be further studied with diverse adolescents.</p> James Sallis Terry L Conway Kelli L Cain Carrie Geremia Edith Bonilla Chad Spoon Copyright (c) 2020 James Sallis, Terry L Conway, Kelli L Cain, Carrie Geremia, Edith Bonilla, Chad Spoon https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 17 30 Accessing Minnesota School Administrators’ Knowledge and Perceptions Related to Sharing School Play Spaces after the Passage of Minnesota Shared Use Legislation http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/3 <p>Lower levels of physical activity among children in the United States can be attributed in part to the lack of access to safe, low-cost recreational facilities. Shared use, or a partnership allowing the community to use school recreational facilities outside of normal hours, has received increased attention. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the extent of knowledge among school decision makers about a law passed clarifying liability for school shared use in Minnesota and to understand perceptions held by school decision makers regarding shared use of recreational facilities. Design, Setting, and Participants: A survey of Minnesota school superintendents and other decision makers (N = 182) was conducted to understand the issues relevant to sharing school recreational facilities with the public. Results: The majority (90%) of respondents indicated concern about liability for injury on school property outside of normal hours, and that insurance and contracts provided the most protection from liability. Most respondents indicated they were not familiar with the Minnesota shared use legislation and its provisions (61.36%, <em>n</em> = 108). Conclusions: Findings suggest the importance of education and training to further school superintendents’ knowledge of Minnesota shared use legislation, legal and policy issues relevant to shared use, and issues related to the implementation of shared use within their Districts.</p> John Spengler Selina Stasi Copyright (c) 2020 john Spengler, Selina Stasi, Coral O'Conner Natasha Frost, Brooke Nunn https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 31 38 JHEAL: What Does It Mean to Initiate a New Journal? http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/12 James Sallis Copyright (c) 2020 James Sallis https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 1 2 Leveraging community engaged policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) approaches to foster healthy eating in the United States http://profpubs.com/index.php/jheal/article/view/9 <p>N/A</p> amy Yaroch Mary Story Courtney Pinard Copyright (c) 2020 Amy Yaroch, Mary Story, Courtney Pinard https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-20 2020-12-20 1 1 3 5